Magic Johnson turned down the deal of a lifetime

With a reported net worth of $500 million, one could argue Magic Johnson doesn’t have any regrets when it comes business deals.

However, during a recent appearance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Magic admitted to a huge mistake he made back in ’79 when he came out of college. Something that still haunts him to this day.

“When I first came out of college, all the shoe companies came after me,” he said. “And there was this guy, Phil Knight, who just started had Nike.”

“All the other companies offered me money, but they (Nike) couldn’t offer me money because they just started,” Magic said. “So he said something [about] stocks—’I’m gonna give you a lot of stocks.’ I didn’t know nothing about stocks. I’m from the inner city, we don’t know about stocks, you know, at the time.”

“Boy, did I make a mistake,” Johnson admits. “I’m still kicking myself. Every time I’m in a Nike store, I get mad. I could’ve been making money off of everybody buying Nikes right now.”

It’s safe to say the decision in 1979 cost him a few billion $. Man, if you could only be a time traveler.

5 WAYS COACHES OVER COMPLICATE THINGS

As coaches, we often “blame” our players for the need to simplify everything but in reality is often us that make things more complicated than necessary. I think there are five reasons for this even though we don’t always do these things intentionally.

1. We worry about things that will never happen.

I’m all for being prepared; in fact I’m a big fan of being over prepared. However, my team does not practice three different jump ball plays and four different offenses to run against a triangle and two defense just in case we ever go into double overtime and see a junk defense.

Instead, we concentrate on using the 80/20 rule – 80% of our practices are focused on the 20% of things that take place every game.

(Sometimes it’s more like 90/10 because we want to be very good at the things that happen most often.) Conversely 20% of our practices are focused on the other 80% of things that don’t happen as frequently.

2. We have a strong desire to impress others.

Most of us will say that we don’t, but many coaches, especially younger ones, want to impress their peers, their players, their players’ parents and their fans with their coaching ability. They mistakenly think that will happen if they run several complicated and intricate offenses.

If that happens to be you keep in mind that Vince Lombardi’s Packers ran only five plays and John Wooden’s famous UCLA teams had only three offenses and he never used all three in the same season. If you want to be as impressive as Lombardi or Wooden don’t overcomplicate things and instead create better leaders, help players improve and execute, and win more games!

3. We don’t consider basketball IQ.

Even though we talk about it all the time some coaches forget that their own basketball IQ and their ability to grasp and process detailed concepts is much greater than that of their players. Remember, it’s not what a coach knows that is most important but rather what the players know and can execute.

Look at it this way – the majority of students are average. A few will get mostly A’s and B’s and a few will get mostly’ D’s and F’s but the vast majority are average in academic knowledge and/or execution. What makes you think your team would be any different? A few of your players will understand everything; a few will understand nothing, and the rest will be average.

4. We mentally get bored.

Earlier I said that many younger coaches want to impress everyone but older coaches have their stumbling blocks too. Many eventually become mentally bored and so start looking for other challenges and other ways to stimulate their thinking.

These coaches often begin studying other coaches and their systems and take detailed notes on every book, video, drill, and diagram they can get their hands on during the off season.When practice starts in the fall they are still excited about what they’ve learned and try to put in everything whether they completely understand how to teach it or not. Before long the players’ heads are spinning and the same coaches are pulling their hair out.

5. We never throw anything away.

Have you ever laughed at your parents or grandparents for never throwing anything away? Of course you have! Well coaches are the exact same way. A coach will put in a quick hitter for a particular game that involves using four post players and will win a game with it.

Then every year after that he will put in the same quick hitter and will practice it regularly even if he doesn’t have a single post player on his roster. Don’t laugh because it happens all the time.Throw old drills, offenses, and defenses away or at least put them in storage. Your team doesn’t need to have 10 offenses, 20 out of bounds plays, and 40 quick hitters – especially since your team is not going to learn/remember/use most of them.

Before you blame your team for overcomplicating your program take a good look at yourself and see if any of these five things apply to you. It might not completely solve the problem but will certainly be a good start.

Good luck!

OFTEN OVERLOOKED WITH LEBRON JAMES

Often overlooked.

With no father….no education….no training….and very few role models….they handed this young dirt poor kid $420,000 per week at the age of 18!

Married his high school sweetheart. Never arrested. Never used drugs. Never humiliated his spouse with side chic stories. No outside babies.

Never in the news with so much as a parking ticket. Excellent father. Heavily involved with his kid’s activities. Greatest player on the PLANET!!

14 years later. Same man. Same maturity. Same woman. Same family. Reputation intact. Now earning close to $2 million per week. Has sent 1100+ kids to college fully paid for.

If you can’t respect THAT, your whole PERSPECTIVE is wrong.

STORY ABOUT Ex-NBA PLAYER DENNIS RODMAN

Last night I came across an awesome story about ex-NBA player Dennis Rodman.

For those who weren’t glued to the TV during his days with Detroit in the 1980’s and with the Chicago Bulls in the 1990’s, here are a few reasons why you should pay attention to his rebounding advice…

He led the league in rebounding 7 times:

1992 18.7 per game
1993 18.3 per game
1994 17.3 per game
1995 16.8 per game
1996 14.9 per game
1997 16.1 per game
1998 15.0 per game

Crazy stats!

Anyway, here’s a quick story that about Dennis told by his former teammate, Isiah Thomas:

“We were standing in the lay-up line, warming up and shooting, and Rodman was standing back and watching everybody shoot.”

Isiah – “Hey, come on, you have to participate; everybody’s shooting lay-ups, you have to shoot lay-ups, too.”

Rodman – “I’m just watching the rotations on the basketball.”

Isiah – “Excuse me?”

Rodman – “Like, when you shoot, your ball spins three times in the air. Joe’s sometimes has 3 1/2 or four times.”

“That’s how far Rodman had taken rebounding, to a totally different level, like off the charts. He knew the rotation of every person that shot on our team – If it spins sideways, where it would bounce, how often it would bounce left or right. He had rebounding down to a science, and I never heard anyone think or talk about rebounding and defence the way he could break it down.”

“When you talk about basketball IQ, I’d put Rodman at a genius level.”- Isiah Thomas

10 WAYS TO EARN MORE PLAYING TIME

One of the most, if not the single most issues between coach and player is, PLAYING TIME. Players want to know why they are not playing more, and what they can do to earn more playing time on the court. Here are 10 areas to look at when trying to earn more time on the court, and less time on the bench.

1. Attitude

The most effective, coachable players are humble in victory and gracious in defeat. They don’t have to earn respect, they demand it by their actions on and off the court.

2. The Perfect Balance

School work, work-study job, off campus job, practice, games, travel. College level players are called “student-athlete” for a reason. They must be able to balance multiple daily tasks while still improving upon their game year in and year out. The college players that are able to find the perfect balance in their everyday daily lives, are the most effective and ones that coaches look to reward.

3. Knowing and Accepting your Role

Coaches will ask players to sacrifice for the betterment of the team. The players that embrace their roles and flourish in them, are the ones that coaches want around and on the floor. Players that second guess and constantly revolt against change, are the ones who will be riding the pine or shown the door.

4. Ability to Defend

Defense wins championships. Players who can score at will, but consistently let their man do the same are not as valuable as a defensive stopper who really isn’t needed to score.

5. Taking Care of the Ball

Coaches hate careless turnovers. Players that feel the need to go between the legs, spin twice and make an around the back pass that sails off the wall, will surely hear the horn and be replaced by a less flashy, but more fundamentally sound player.

6. Accept / Follow-Though on Criticism

Players will be given areas to improve upon during all stages of the year. The ones that act upon recommended weaknesses by following through and showing results will be noticed.

7. Teammate 1st

Players that pass up a good shot for a great shot, encourage teammates in workouts, practices and games, and go out of their way to help teammates in all situations, are the ones that make a program run on all cylinders. Players that demand the limelight, preach about individual stats, brag about their value to the team and isolate themselves from the group, are going to suck the energy from the program and are in fact, better off on their own.

8. Ability to Make Others Better

Similar to a great defender, a player that can make the four others around them better by setting up teammates to score, are much more valuable than 1-deminsional scorers. Coaches will take a 2-1 assist-to-turnover guy any day over a double digit scorer. First off all, they are going to set up teammates for great scoring opportunities and secondly, they’re going to take care of the ball.

9. Hustle Stats

Floor burns, drawing offensive charges, diving into the crowd, offensive rebounds, deflections, 5-second calls, sprinting in-between the three point lines. What basketball coach doesn’t love these intangibles in a player?

10. 1st to Show, Last to Leave

The guys that are in the gym before the coaching staff and then have to be kicked out following practice, are the ones who coaches want to be a large part of their program. Gym rats will almost always be rewarded for their commitment to the program, and their uncanny work ethic.

There are other things that players can do to earn more playing time in any given program, but if players follow these 10 tips to earning more playing time, they will be well ahead of the game, and will no doubt be hard to remove from the rotation.

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